Reg No. S-10491 of 2009
 
 
 
 
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You are here » RESEARCH » COMPLETED PROJECTS
Completed Research
Economic opportunity survey
PRA and workshop with dairy farmers
Male fertility and AI
Female fertility and non-pregnancy diagnosis
On-farm dairy cattle nutrition
Effect of nutrition on postpartum cyclicity in buffalo
Follicular dynamics by ultrasonography in zebu cattle
 
Economic opportunity Survey
 
“A Survey To Identify Economic Opportunities For Smallholder Dairy Farms In Bangladesh” was made by a group of scientist leading by Professor Dr. Mohammed Shamsuddin. The survey was conducted on 1440 dairy farms in Bangladesh. The economic opportunity report was made on production and reproduction indices and cost of producing milk in four areas of Bangladesh viz., plain land (Mymensingh district), saline land (Khulna district), milk pocket (Sirajgonj-Pabna district) and hilly zone (Chittagong district). The numbers of lactating cow per farms were 1.5, 2.2, 3.4, and 2.7 in plain land, saline, milk pocket and hilly zone, respectively. The calf mortality, age at first calving, calving interval, lactation length and milk production were 4-10%, 34-44 months, 14-18 months, 247-288 days and 3-7 liters based on the locality. The median costs for producing 1 liter milk was US$ 0.3131, 0.2551, 0.1712 and 0.2722 in plain land, saline zone milk pocket and hilly zone, respectively. Irrespective of milk producing areas, increased in daily milk production per cow ranked the highest economic opportunity (US$ 526.37-981.72). The economic opportunity ranked lowest for calf mortality (US$ 1.32-4.71) in plain land, saline zone and hilly zone and for calving interval in milk pocket zone (US$ 1.30). The survey concluded that the management improvements directed towards increasing milk production, increasing lactation length, decreasing age to first calving could expect income increasing up to a range of $525 to $1363 depending on the milk producing area.
 
PRA and workshop with dairy farmers
 
The 15 member Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) team headed by Professor Dr. Mohammed Shamsuddin conducted a study on “Participatory Rural Appraisal to Assess Small-Scale Market-Oriented Dairy Farmers’ Needs and Prospects at Four Districts of Bangladesh”. The PRA was carried out with the kinds of target groups who were farmers and who had at least 4-5 breedable cows and were selling 80-90% of the milk produced. The investigators used 12 tools namely rapport build-up, participatory social mapping, changing trend/time line, activity profiles for men and women, seasonal calendar, system analysis diagram, preference ranking and scoring, matrix ranking, pie charts, mobility diagram, focus group discussion and semi-structured interview. The socio-demographic profile revealed that the average family size was 7.4, 7.8, 9.8 and 7.8 for plain land, saline zone, milk pocket and hilly zone, respectively. In milk pocket, highest portion of land (55%) was used for fodder cultivation while in other three areas cultivation of crop occupied the highest portion of land (57% - 80%). The husband used to spend 38%, 35%, 38% and 42% of their 24 hours time while the housewives used to spend 19%, 15%, 22% and 17% of their 24 hours time for dairying at plain land, saline zone, milk pocket and hilly zone respectively. Friesian crossbred cow was ranked top irrespective of the areas studied. The veterinary services and artificial insemination-related services were given the highest (19-21) and second highest scores (7-20) by the plain land, saline zone and hilly zone farmers. Straw comprises 49%, 27%, 40% and 42% of dairy cattle feed at plain land, saline zone, milk pocket and hilly zone, respectively. The plain land, saline zone, milk pocket and hilly zone farmers identified 9, 9, 8 and 12 root causes, respectively, that limited dairy development at their community. Both farmers and professionals were in the opinion that efficient veterinary and AI services would be a great contribution to the dairying. The farmers gave their opinion that the size of a small-scale sustainable dairy farm should be 10-30 heads of cattle having 4-12 lactating cows with 22-70 liters milk produced daily, given a constant milk price of Tk. 16-20 per litre, depending on the area studied to formulate future interventions for dairy development by overcoming the constraints of Bangladesh.
 
Male fertility and AI
 
Reproduction scientist Mohammed Azizur Rahman Siddiqui completed his PhD degree entitled “Laboratory Tests to Predict Bull Fertility and the Value of Sperm Nuclear Shape Analysis”. The researcher showed that the sperm nuclear shape images by Fourier harmonic analysis method, which was associated with fertility of individual bull. The differences exist between bodies of uterus; horn of uterus, isthmus and ampulla with regard to the number of spermatozoa bound at individual time points was viewed through the study. However, differences between bulls were not significant. Percentage of embryos cleaved after fertilization with different bulls was also focused by the study.
 
Female fertility and non-pregnancy diagnosis
 
Reproduction scientist, AHM Saiful Islam Khan completed his PhD research work entitled “Development of Milk Progesterone ELISA and its Application at AI Field Services in Cattle”. The researcher developed and standardized the technique for milk ELISA with conjugate and substrate. He emphasizes bronopol as a suitable preservative and extraction of milk as an important step in the progesterone ELISA. Individual cow variations and determination of luteal function in zebu and crossbred cows were overemphasized in the researcher’s view.
 
On-farm dairy cattle nutrition
 
A nutrition scientist, Mr. Tomij Uddin Ahmed completed his PhD work entitled “Studies on Nutritional Status of Dairy Cows of Bangladesh and Improvement of their Productive and Reproductive Performance in Baghabarighat Area through Nutritional Manipulation”. The researcher overviewed the scarcity of green forage supply throughout the year in the four region viz., Sirajgonj, Satkhira, Chittagong and Mymensingh of Bangladesh. However, baghabarighat area has a different scenario of feed supply and feeding practice (compared to other) where the farmers cultivate legume forage in winter whereas no green forage supply in monsoon. On the other hand, nutritional status of cows in all four areas is reflection of feed supply, which also depends on season. Status of cows of Baghabarighat was the highest and Mymensingh was the lowest. The researcher views that herbal deworm (pineapple and neem) has good effect on gastro-intestinal nematodes infection and subsequent milk production.
 
Effect of nutrition on postpartum cyclicity in buffalo
 
“Effect of Nutrition Conditions on Postpartum Onset of Ovarian Cyclicity in Water Buffaloes” in Kanihari Union of Mymensingh District has been carried out by an MS student. The objectives of the study was (1) improving the reproduction and production of dairy buffaloes, (2) observing the relationship between body condition score (BCS) and onset of postpartum cyclicity in buffalo cows, (3) determining the accuracy of estrus detection and (4) applying milk progesterone ELISA to monitor reproductive events in buffaloes.
 
Follicular dynamics by ultrasonography in zebu cattle
 
We used ultrasonogray in cattle for the first time in Bangladesh. A research work entitled “Ultrasonographic examination of ovarian cyclicity in zebu cows” has been carried out by an MS student. This study was performed to examine the cyclicity in zebu cows by transrectal-ultrasonography. This work was the preliminary study on ultrasonography and it is concluded that indigenous zebu cows of Bangladesh are likely to have follicular dynamics similar to other breeds of cattle.
 
 
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